Cardwell Primary School

LEARNING FOR LIFE.

Mutual Respect, Resilience,
Responsibility, Tolerance and Perseverance

COVID 19

Rules and guidance regarding Covid has changed recently.  The guidance previously given by the Department for Education has now been replaced with guidance from the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA). This means that we have replaced our Covid 19 risk assessment with a ‘Living with Covid Strategy’. 

Living with Covid Strategy April 2022

Living With Covid Letter 11.04.2022

 

Information about COVID Catch Up Funding can be found by clicking below:

Coronavirus Catch Up Funding

 

Further information from the government can be found by clicking below: 

People with symptoms of a respiratory infection including COVID-19

Thank you for your continued support.    

 

      Mrs Lazell                                                Mr Dunbabin

Executive Headteacher                                  Head of School

Coronavirus symptoms in your household

Symptoms of respiratory infections, including COVID-19

Respiratory infections can spread easily between people. It is important to be aware of symptoms so you can take action to reduce the risk of spreading your infection to other people.

The symptoms of COVID-19 and other respiratory infections are very similar. It is not possible to tell if you have COVID-19, flu or another respiratory infection based on symptoms alone. Most people with COVID-19 and other respiratory infections will have a relatively mild illness, especially if they have been vaccinated.

If you have symptoms of a respiratory infection, such as COVID-19, and you have a high temperature or you do not feel well enough to go to work or carry out normal activities, you are advised to try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people.

Symptoms of COVID-19, flu and common respiratory infections include:

  • Continuous cough
  • High temperature, fever or chills
  • Loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell
  • Shortness of breath
  • Unexplained tiredness, lack of energy
  • Muscle aches or pains that are not due to exercise
  • Not wanting to eat or not feeling hungry
  • Headache that is unusual or longer lasting than usual
  • Sore throat, stuffy or runny nose
  • Diarrhoea, feeling sick or being sick

If you are feeling unwell with these symptoms you should get plenty of rest and drink water to keep hydrated. You can use medications such as paracetamol to help with your symptoms. Antibiotics are not recommended for viral respiratory infections because they will not relieve your symptoms or speed up your recovery.

In some cases, you might continue to have a cough or feel tired after your other symptoms have improved, but this does not mean that you are still infectious.

You can find information about these symptoms on the NHS website.

If you are concerned about your symptoms, or they are worsening, seek medical advice by contacting NHS 111. In an emergency dial 999.

Request for For Absence During Covid-19

Holidays are not permitted during term time unless in exceptional circumstances. All request for special leave should be made in writing two weeks in advance. The Public Health England has updated the guidance for educational settings regarding travelling during the novel coronavirus outbreak. 

If you have travelled within the last 14 days please follow the guidelines before returning to school. When you travel to England, you do not need to:

  • Complete a UK passenger locator form before you travel
  • Take any COVID-19 tests before you travel or after you arrive
  • Quarantine when you arrive

This applies whether you are vaccinated or not. It includes people who are transiting through England. Other countries may have rules about what you need to do to leave the country to travel to England. You should check travel advice for the country you are travelling from.

You can find information on Check the quarantine rules when entering England on GOV.UK

When to self-isolate

If you have a positive COVID-19 test result, it is very likely that you have COVID-19 even if you do not have any symptoms. You can pass on the infection to others, even if you have no symptoms.

Many people with COVID-19 will no longer be infectious to others after 5 days. If you have a positive COVID-19 test result, try to stay at home and avoid contact with other people for 5 days after the day you took your test. There is different advice for children and young people aged 18 and under.

During this period there are actions you can take to reduce the risk of passing COVID-19 on to others.

Try to work from home if you can. If you are unable to work from home, talk to your employer about options available to you.

If you have been asked to attend a medical or dental appointment in person, contact your healthcare provider and let them know about your positive test result.

You may wish to ask friends, family or neighbours to get food and other essentials for you.

At the end of this period, if you have a high temperature or feel unwell, try to follow this advice until you feel well enough to resume normal activities and you no longer have a high temperature if you had one.

Although many people will no longer be infectious to others after 5 days, some people may be infectious to other people for up to 10 days from the start of their infection. You should avoid meeting people at higher risk of becoming seriously unwell from COVID-19, especially those whose immune system means that they are at higher risk of serious illness from COVID-19, despite vaccination, for 10 days after the day you took your test.

If you live with someone who has COVID-19 or stayed overnight in their household

You're likely to catch COVID-19 if you live with or have stayed overnight in the household of someone who has the virus.

If you’ve had contact with someone who’s tested positive, it can take up to 10 days for your COVID-19 infection to develop. This means you could pass on the virus to other people, even if you do not have symptoms. As you should be aware you do not need to do daily rapid lateral flow tests anymore if you've been in close contact with someone with COVID-19.

You can take steps to reduce the chance of passing COVID-19 on to others by: 

  • Avoid contact with the person who has COVID-19 as much as you can.

  • Avoid contact with people at higher-risk from COVID-19, especially if their immune system means they’re at higher risk of serious illness from COVID-19, even if they’ve had a COVID-19 vaccine.

  • Limit contact with people you do not live with, particularly in crowded places, indoors or where there is not much fresh air.

  • Wear a face covering that fits snugly against your face and has more than 1 layer where you're in close contact with other people, or in crowded places.

  • Wash your hands often with soap or water, or use hand sanitiser. 

Get tested for Coronavirus

If you have these symptoms get plenty of rest and remain hydrated. A test can be taken by they are not free anymore; they can be ordered online or purchased from a chemist. Wear a mask if you are displaying symptoms, Maintain distance, Excellent hygiene, Cover nose and mouth if coughing and sneezing. 

From now on children who test positive are advised to stay at home for 3 days to prevent further spread while adults are advised to stay at home for 5 days.  

 There are 2 main types of test being used to detect if someone has COVID-19:

  • Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)
  • Lateral flow device (LFD) antigen tests – also known as rapid lateral flow tests

 

If you are concerned about your symptoms, or they are worsening, seek medical advice by contacting NHS 111. In an emergency dial 999.